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Цитата #447835

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Муж у меня - храбрец из храбрецов. Если посмотрим на ночь ужастик, посреди ночи он просыпается, подтаскивает к нашей кровати кроватку ребёнка и досыпает, держа его за ручку, чтобы не бояться.
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troff
50 days ago
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Amazon Has Obtained Pharmaceutical Wholesaler Licenses In 12 States

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There are a few things left that Amazon.com doesn’t sell, and one of them is prescription drugs. Yet for most of the last year, analysts and retail-watchers have speculated that Amazon may be looking to get into the prescription drug business. Now there’s proof that the retailer has taken more official steps toward becoming a mail-order pharmacy.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Amazon has become a licensed pharmaceutical wholesaler in 12 states, with a pending application in a thirteenth. To ship drugs directly to consumers, competing with large pharmacy benefit managers and mail-order pharmacies like Caremark or Express Scripts, Amazon would also need to be licensed as a pharmacy in each state to which it shipped drugs.

The facilities listed on the applications are distribution centers in Indiana. One industry analyst observed to the Post-Dispatch that Amazon may be building its own pharmacy capabilities, or could acquire an existing pharmacy, as it did when it acquired Whole Foods to bolster the grocery business that it had been building for years.

The Post-Dispatch was able to confirm through public records that Amazon has been approved as a pharmaceutical wholesaler in the states of Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Idaho, Louisiana, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Dakota, Oregon, and Tennessee. An application in Maine is still pending.

The names on applications are people who previously worked in the medical supplies and mail-order pharmacy industry, according to LinkedIn.

Amazon declined to comment to the Post-Dispatch, calling the clues “rumors and speculation.”





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troff
81 days ago
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satadru
81 days ago
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Exhibit A
New York, NY

Цитата #447406

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xxx: бардак в квартире. мне надо немножко подубраться и сесть за дела
ууу: "немножко подубраться" — это 250 коньяка))
ххх: например))))
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troff
82 days ago
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If You’re Flying To The U.S. This Week, Be Prepared For Delays, New Security Measures

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In June, the Department of Homeland Security gave an ultimatum to airports around the world: Beef up your security or face a ban on carry-on electronics on flights heading to America. Tomorrow is the deadline for those advanced security measures to be in place, so U.S.-bound travelers should prepare themselves accordingly.

Starting tomorrow, Oct. 26, 280 airports in 105 countries must have in place a set of new enhanced security measures — such as increased screening of electronic devices — for the estimated 2,000 daily flights traveling to the U.S.

In announcing the new restrictions in June, then-Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly (he’s now President Trump’s Chief of Staff) said the agency was raising “the global baseline of global aviation security.”

The measures — which were to take effect 120 days from the announcement — were put in place as the agency began to lift its previous laptop ban on airports and planes flying to the U.S. from eight countries in the Middle East and North Africa.

Ready For Delays?

While DHS did not provide specific details on the enhanced screening, the agency said it would lay out a “clear path” to encourage airlines and airports to adopt more sophisticated screening approaches, including better use of explosive detection canines and advanced checkpoint screening technology.

Additionally, the agency said it would encourage more airports to become Preclearance locations, where security is enhanced because passengers go through customs and border security screening before boarding flights to the U.S.

Consumerist has reached out to DHS for additional information on the new measures, we’ll update this post if we hear back.

Reuters reports that several airlines have put in the work to meet the still-unspecified security measures, increasing concerns that delays will begin to plague airports around the world.

For instance, Cathay Pacific Airways says it has revamped its check-in processes and suspended self bag-drop services. The airline tells Reuters that it will also have short security interviews for passengers traveling to the U.S.

As a result of the new measures, the airline is suggesting passengers arrive at the airport three hours before departure.

Similarly, Lufthansa tells Reuters that passengers should arrive at the airport 90 minutes before departure as they may face short interviews at the gate or check-in areas.

Singapore Airlines said it would deploy security questioning during the check-in process and boarding, Reuters notes.

But Why?

While many airlines and airports say they are ready to meet the new security standards, they’re still confused as to why they are necessary at all.

When Kelly announced the requirements in June, he didn’t provide any details on whether or not there were new credible threats to U.S. flights.

The DHS’ FAQ on the new measures only notes that “recently evaluated intelligence indicates terrorist groups continue to advance multiple efforts to target the aviation sector and are seeking ways to circumvent aviation security.”

Alexandre de Juniac, CEO of the International Air Transport Association, tells Reuters that the way the new measures were introduced was “very strange.”

“Unilateral measures announced without any prior consultation… That is something that is very concerning and disturbing,” he said.

The group contends that such moves by individual governments could cause unnecessary disruptions and unintended safety consequences.

Still, if airlines want to avoid laptop bans, they must abide by the new rules.

Airports that do not cooperate with the new measures or are too slow to adopt them “could be subject to other restrictions—including a ban on electronic devices on their airplanes, or even a suspension of their flights to the United States,” Kelly said in June.

To determine if foreign airports are abiding by the new regulations, DHS will assess and inspect airlines. It’s unclear when these inspections will begin.





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troff
82 days ago
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Amazon Wine Marketplace Closing Dec. 31

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If you buy wine through the Amazon Wine marketplace, you might want to stock up: The e-commerce giant will close its online wine store Dec. 31. 

TechCrunch reports that Amazon notified wine sellers of the impending closure in emails this week, noting that it will shutter the platform and final orders must be placed by Dec. 31.

The demise of Amazon Wine came after the retailer faced issues related to how alcohol is sold and marketed.

Since launching Amazon Wine in 2012, Amazon has increased its focus on the beverage: First by selling it through its Amazon Fresh grocery delivery service, and then by ferrying it to homes in just a few hours with Prime Now.

More recently, the company acquired Whole Foods, and along with it, the grocery chain’s wine sales.

As a result, it became difficult for the company to both sell its own drinks as a retailer and operate a separate wine marketplace online for third-parties, TechCrunch reports.

In the end, the company had to decide where to put its focus, and naturally, its wine business won out.

Despite closing Amazon Wine, the company will continue to offer wine through its Prime Now and Amazon Fresh services.

Amazon Wine was launched with the intention of providing customers with curated wines for any occasion. The platform offered a plethora of wines from around the U.S. ranging from $10 to $100 per bottle, with shipping up to six bottles for a flat fee of $9.99.





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troff
83 days ago
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И тут
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MasterCard Ending Signature Requirements

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For as long as we can remember, paying with a credit card required you to sign your name on the dotted line. While this system has changed over the years — mandating your John Hancock only for purchases over a certain amount — MasterCard is perhaps planning the biggest change of them all: The payment company will eliminate signature payments altogether. 

Starting in April 2018, MasterCard users will no longer be required to sign their name when they purchase something using their debit or credit cards.

The change comes as the company has eliminated signatures over time. To date, the company says that just 20% of transactions in North America still require a signature at checkout.

Convenient & Secure

By doing away with signatures, MasterCard says it is taking another step in its “digital evolution of payments and payment security,” while also providing convenience for customers.

“At first glance, this might sound like a radical proclamation, especially to people who have had credit and debit cards for decades,” Linda Kirkpatrick, executive vice president of market development at MasterCard, said in a statement. “However, the change matches all of our expectations for fast and convenient shopping experiences.”

According to MasterCard’s own consumer research, the majority of people believe it would be easier to pay and that checkout lines would move faster if they didn’t need to sign when making a purchase.

As for security, MasterCard assures customers that removing the need for signatures at the time of checkout will not impact the safety of their purchases.

For starters, shoppers generally just scribble their name in the “sign here” box at checkout. Often those signatures aren’t checked against anything, otherwise we’d probably have a lot more denied transactions.

MasterCard notes that its network and payment system already include other methods to prove someone’s identity, including the use of chips, tokenization, and personalized identification numbers.

“Beyond what you see and experience at checkout, there is behind-the-scenes technology at work every second of every day to protect every transaction,” Kirkpatrick notes.

All In Agreement

MasterCard’s impending signature change has already been greeted with support from merchants.

Kirkpatrick says the move will help partner merchants speed customers through checkouts, provide more consistent experiences, and decrease the costs associated with storing signatures.

The Retail Industry Leaders Association — which counts a number of major retailers, such as Apple, Best Buy, Gap, Target, Walmart, and others as members — called MasterCard’s end of signature requirement a “good first step.”

The change addresses retailers’ long-argued position that signature requirements are costly, and a now less relevant way to secure transactions.

“RILA supports this policy change and encourages other payment networks to follow Mastercard’s lead,” Austen Jenson, president of government affairs for RILA, said in a statement. “Going forward, the payment industry needs to focus on finding solutions to the growth of fraud both in stores and online, where current measures are inadequate for protecting consumers and merchants.”





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troff
88 days ago
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bogorad
88 days ago
stupid journalists! signature has a totally different meaning - it's an act of signing that is important, e.g. if you sign a transaction done with a stolen card it's fraud.
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